Vintage Murano

Maestro Imperio Rossi

Millefiori Art Glass Vase

XX Century

 Dimensions: Height: 18-3/4 inches         Diameter: 8-3/4 inches

 Found in the middle section of the vase’ neck, there is a round glass medallion with letter “m”, indented into it for Maestro Imperio Rossi.

This grand Murrine Millefiori decorative flower vase was hand-blown in Murano, Italy by Maestro Imperio Rossi for Vetreria Di Pi. The Vetreria Artistica DiPi glassworks has been founded in Murano in 1986 by Imperio Rossi, followed by Mario Costantini. Imperio entered in the world of glass when he was only a boy of 13, following his father's steps and  working side-by-side with some of the most important and talented Murano glass-masters, refining his skills and learning ancient secrets of this charming art. The production at DiPi's was at the beginning focussed on artistic vases, plates, and wedding favors, shifting later to the Millefiori technique by using Murrine, and creates objects of unmistakable Venetian taste, recognized worldwide. Some of Impero Rossi's creations are shown in the museums of Tokyo, Vienna, Madrid and New York.

$4,500


ART DECO

Charles Schneider

Bubbled Art Glass & Forged Iron Vase

France, circa 1918

Dimensions: 7-3/4” high x in 5-15/16” diameter (vase) x 4-3/8” diameter (base)

Charles Schneider was born in Chateau-Thierry, near Paris, on 23rd February 1881. At an early age, he moved with his family to Nancy, the artistic center of France. His brother, Ernest Schneider (1877-1937), started working for Daum in 1903 as clerk. Charles had started an artistic career and was already active at Daum since 1898. Concurrently, he studied the Ecole des Beaux-Arts in Nancy.

In 1913, the brothers decided to start their own business and bought a small glass factory, specializing in electric light bulbs, in association with a friend Henri Wolf, at Epinay-sur-Seine. This factory was known as ‘Schneider Freres & Wolf’. The new glassworks production started with, among others, a group of about twenty workers enticed away from the Daum manufacture. At the outbreak of the World War I, the firm's activity had to be stopped and the glassworks closed by the end of 1914.

In 1917, the factory re-opened once again, under the name "Societe Anonyme des Verreries Schneider". At this time, public taste still favored the Art Nouveau style, and the factory produced mainly ‘cameo’ glass with floral and animal designs, and vases with applied handles and bubbles. Apart from the introduction of art glass, half of the production was of commercial drinking glasses. In 1918, fire destroyed the studios at Galle and a group of artists went to Schneider’s to continue their production for Galle.

Some of the factory's most interesting models during the early period were designed by Gaston Hoffman between 1918 and 1921. His pieces are not signed with his name, since he was a salaried employee of the firm. Most of his models are in the top rank of the factory's production.

After the 1925 exhibition, various new designs were created and the factory expanded to employ about 500 workers. Most of Schneider’s art vases and lamps were exported to America.

 After the Wall Street crash of 1929, demand dwindled and the factory started to decline. During the 1930’s production of art glass was down to a few pieces a day as they concentrated on making simple designs with less colors for the local market.

Attempts were made to save the firm, but Ernest had been seriously ill since the end of the 1920's and was of no help. He died in June 1937, one month after the liquidation of the "Verreries Schneider". In 1940, during the war, the factory was requisitioned by the German troops and used as a restaurant.

In 1950, Charles Schneider and his son founded a new glassworks at Epinay-sur-Seine, named "Cristalleries Schneider", which was later transferred to Lloris after an accident caused by a gas explosion. Like the old Schneider factory, this one specialized in free-blown glass. Following the artistic trend of the 1950's, the glassworks produced glass sculptures, crystal vases (sometimes bubbled and colored), ashtrays, clock frames, candlesticks and fruit bowls. But this time, the glass was lead crystal, which had come back into favor in France during the 1930's after being revived in Scandinavia. It was no longer cut, but worked almost exclusively by free-blowing and drawing. All the productions were signed "Schneider France".

Charles Schneider’s died in 1952 and the factory was closed in 1981.

$1,000


Louis Comfort Tiffany

Favrille

Iridescent Blue, Purple & Brown Art Glass

Queen Bowl

Ca. 1900

Signed on base "L.C.T.” (Louis Comfort Tiffany) and "Favrile”.

Dimensions:   Diameter: 8.25" | Height: 3.25”

A fine Art Nouveau Louis Comfort Tiffany’ Favrile iridescent blue, purple and brown art glass Queen Bowl with scalloped edges and a ruffled rim, circa 1900.

$1,800


after Loetz

REPRODUCTION

Bohemian Art Nouveau Art Glass  Flower Vase

XX Century

Dimensions:

Height: 10.25”     Width: 7.75”     Depth: 4.75”     Neck diameter: 2.25”     Base: 4.5” x 3”

A superior example of Jugendstil ~ Art Nouveau art glass objects, this museum quality vase was made by Loetz, Klostermühle (Bohemia) circa 1900. The simplicity of the form of this vessel and silver frame is generating an extremely interesting decorative effect in Jugendstil ~ Art Nouveau style. The art-glass strikes a spectator with unexpected color scheme - a combination of a free form silver spots on the bright blood-orange background and wavy-like multicolor lines at the base.

$1,800


Dino Martens

For Aureliano Toso Art Studio

Mid-Century Modern

Murano Art Glass Bottle Vase

1960s

This magnificent and outstandingly elegant Murano art glass hand-blown bottle vase with red, blue and white filigrana ribbons and gold dust was designed by famous Dino Martens for Aureliano Toso art studio in the 1960s. A perfect synthesis between ancient Chinese aesthetics and mid-century modern style trend of the period.

Dimensions:

Height: 19-5/8”

Neck Diameter: 1-9/16”

Base Diameter: 4-7/16”

Max. Diameter: 6-5/8 inches

Dino Martens (1894–1970) was an Italian painter and designer particularly noted for his glasswork trained at the Accademia di Belli Arti. He had his paintings exhibited at th Venice Biennale (1924–1930) and after his return from Italy's African wars became the artistic director of Aureliano Tosso (the famous Venetian glassworks). He remained there for many years, producing many noted works using traditional Venetian techniques but producing some original effects, "daring" asymmetric shapes - the designs often being marked by their obvious difficulty of execution.

SOLD


Loetz

Bohemian Art Nouveau

Art-Glass Silver-Mounted

Flower Vase

~ 1900 -

Dimensions:         H – 6.33”   D (1) – 6.5”   D (2) – 4.5”

A superior example of Jugendstil ~ Art Nouveau art glass objects, this museum quality vase was made by Loetz, Klostermühle (Bohemia) circa 1900. The art-glass strikes a spectator with unexpected color scheme - a combination of dark green, iridescent pearl-white and blood orange. The vase is framed by outstandingly designed and stunningly manufactured sterling silver mounting, crowning the neck. The simplicity of the forms both, the glass vessel and silver frame are generating extremely interesting decorative effects in Jugendstil ~ Art Nouveau style.

Good antique condition consistent with age and use. There is no damage or repairs.

We make our best effort to provide a fair and descriptive condition report. Please examine the photos attentively. Send us a message to request more details or discuss price.

$7,300


Bohemian Art Nouveau

LOETZ

Iridescent Art-Glass Flower Vase

- 1900 -

Dimensions:         H – 16.75”   W – 11.75”   D – 8.5”

A superior example of Jugendstil ~ Art Nouveau art-glass object, this grand in scale, museum quality flower vase was made by Loetz, Klostermühle (Bohemia), circa 1900.

The art-glass strikes a spectator not only with the uniqueness of its surface, reminiscent of crocodile skin, but also with unexpected color scheme - a combination of dark blue-green with the color of the old green patina, covered with craquelure; against the background of iridescent violet.

The vase is framed by outstandingly designed and stunningly manufactured bronzed & patinated pewter mounting, consisting of an almost geometric-form simple large handles; with one wreath of leaves, crowning the neck; and the second, forming a vase base of a free rounded lines.

The simplicity of the forms both, the glass vessel and most unusual metal frame are generating extremely interesting Jugendstil ~ Art Nouveau decorative effects.

There is no damage or repairs.

 

sold


Emily Brock

Turquoise & Black Bar

Art Glass Sculpture

21st Century

Process:                Kiln and Lamp worked glass, aluminum, silicone adhesive
Dimensions:         Height: 11 inches       Width: 12.75 inches       Depth: 12.75 inches

INDIVIDUAL EXHIBITIONS:

·2005 Solo exhibit, Hawk Gallery, Columbus, Ohio

·2003 Solo exhibit, Habatat Gallery, Boca Raton, Florida

·2001 Habatat Galleries, Pontiac, Michigan

·1999 “Favorite Environments” Riley Hawk Galleries, Columbus, Ohio

·1998 Habatat Galleries, Boca Raton, Florida

·1998 “Tray Scapes” Habatat Galleries, Chicago, Illinois

·1997 Habatat Galleries, Pontiac, Michigan

·1995 Habatat Galleries, Boca Raton, Florida

·1995 Habatat Galleries, Pontiac, Michigan

·1994 “Celebrations” Habatat Galleries, Farmington Hills, Michigan

·1993 “Games” Habatat Galleries, Farmington Hills, Michigan

·1992 Habatat Galleries, Boca Raton, Florida

·1992 “Personal Spaces” Habatat Galleries, Farmington Hills, Michigan

·1991 “Uptown, Downtown” Habatat Galleries, Farmington Hills, Michigan

·1990 “Places and Spaces” Elaine Horwitch Galleries, Santa Fe, New Mexico

·1990 “Escapes” Habatat Galleries, Farmington Hills, Michigan

·1990 “Mainstreet USA” Habatat Galleries, Lathrup Village, Michigan

·1989 “Wines & Spirits” Habatat Galleries, Farmington Hills, Michigan

·1988 “Recent Work: Fused/Slumped Glass” Mariposa Gallery, Albuquerque, New Mexico

·1987 “New York” Habatat Galleries, Bay Harbor Islands, Florida

·1987 “Environments, A Series of Glass Constructions” Habatat Galleries, Venture Gallery, Lathrup Village, Michigan

 

SELECTED GROUP EXHIBITIONS

·2004-05 Group Exhibition, “Fragile Nature”, Habatat Galleries, Royal Oak, Michigan

·2003 “Northern Lights” art gkass in Santa Fe, Running Ridge Gallery, Santa Fe, New Mexico

·2003 “Five from Ten” The Alfred Berkowitz Gallery, The University of Michigan Dearborn, Michigan

·2002 “From Tiffany to Chihuly” Twentieth Century Art Glass, Patrick and Beatrice Haggerty Museum of Art, Milwaukee, Wisconsin

·1997 “Currents in Contemporary Glass” Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

·1996 Exhibition, “Brock, Shaffer, Zynsky” Riley Hawk Galleries, Columbus, Ohio

·1995 “New Arrivals” Riley Hawk Galleries, Columbus, Ohio

·1995 “Attention to Detail” Habatat Galleries, Aspen, Colorado

·1993 “Maximizing the Minimum” Museum of American Glass, Wheaton Village, Millville, New Jersey

·1992 “Contemporary Kilnformed Glass” Contemporary Crafts Gallery, Portland, Oregon

·1991 “World Glass Now ‘91” Sapporo, Japan

·1990 “The Art of Albuquerque” The Allbuquerque Museum, Albuquerque, New Mexico

·1989-05 “The International Glass Invitational” Habatat Galleries, Boca Raton, Florida

·1988-05 “ New Art Forms/SOFA” Navy Pier, Chicago, Illinois

·1988-05 “The Annual International Glass Invitational” Habatat Galleries, Royal Oak, Michigan

·1986-88 “The New Aesthetic”, An International Glass Invitational, Habatat Galleries, Bay Harbor Islands, Florida

·1986-91 “Scale/Detail” Habatat Galleries, Farmington Hills, Michigan

·1985 “Statements” Albuquerque, New Mexico

 

WORKS IN SELECTED COLLECTIONS:

·Franklin Park Conservatory, Colombus, Ohio

·Patrick and Beatrice Haggerty Museum of Art, Marquette University, Milwaukee, Wisconsin

·Hsinchu Cultural Center, Taiwan

·Charles A. Wustum Museum of Fine Arts, Racine, Wisconsin

·Columbus Museum of Art, Columbus, Ohio

·Detroit Institute of Arts, Detroit, Michigan

·Albuquerque Museum, Albuquerque, New Mexico

·Museum of American Glass, Wheaton Village, Millville, New Jersey

·University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa

·The Toledo Museum of Art, Toledo, Ohio

·Shimonoseki City Art Museum, Shimonoseki City, Japan

·Hokkaido Museum of Modern Art, Sapporo, Japan

·High Museum of Art, Atlanta, Georgia

·Bullseye Glass Company, Portland, Oregon

 

$3,500


French Art Nouveau

~ Perfume Bottle ~

Etched & Hand-Engraved Crystal and Silver Repose

Body Lotion or Bath Salt Jar

Ca. 1900

Dimensions:

Height: 5 1/2 inches         Max. width: 3 1/2 inches         Bottom diameter: 2 7/8 inches

                This fine and unusual French antique perfume bottle of a superb quality and workmanship and can also function as a body lotion or bath salt jar/bottle. After over a hundred years, today this elegant object is ready to be used for the intended purposes, and would be an exquisitely tasteful decoration for a dressing table, dresser or vanity of the most demanding of the ladies. It is made of a very thick crystal and has a sterling silver hinged round lid. The crystal part of the bottle is masterfully etched and hand-engraved throughout its perimeter with the Irises pattern, a floral motif made one of the most popular during the Art Nouveau era. The top of the sterling silver hinged round lid is also decorated with a charming bouquet of the same flowers, rendered in the repose technique. Both, the neck and the top cover of the lid are stamped with a full set of French hallmarks, half-erased due to long-term use and therefore illegible. The repose bouquet of Irises on the cover is stamped additionally with an essayist' hallmark with artist initials "RD". This beautiful perfume bottle is in fine antique condition consistent with age, with minimal wear to crystal and silver parts, no cracks, no hairlines, no damages, no restorations.

 

$450


Mid-Century Italian Modernism

Luciano Vistosi

Venetian Murano Art Glass

- Bud Vase -

Ca. 1955

Dimensions: Height: 4 3/4 inches            Length: 8 1/2 inches            Depth: 6 1/2 inches

This absolutely unique, beautiful red, green and clear art glass bud vase of the most unusual design was created in the 1950's or 1960's by Luciano Vistosi, who was born and died on the islands of Murano in the lagoon of Venice, the great sculptor and glass artist,  and one of the most significant figures in recent Italian art.

 Luciano Vistosi (Italian, 1931 – 2010 )

It was in the glass manufactory of his father that Luciano Vistosi (Murano, Italy: 1931 – 2010 ) learned to pull and raise the incandescent mass and transform it into an eagle, a dove, a farming girl, a female nude; or nightmares. Following his father’s death in 1952, Vistosi founded the new Vetreria Vistosi with his uncle Oreste and brother Gino with the aim of making products linked to the latest developments in design. He also involved some leading firms, such as Aulenti, Sottsass, Magistretti, Zanuso, and Peduzzi. He concentrated above all on lighting, producing new products, including some famous series of wall sconces. But what appealed most to him was sculpture. In his artistic development as “sculptor”, Vistosi tested various techniques other than blown glass. Some works are sculpted from enormous blocks of rough glass in line with the “art of removal” typical of sculpting marble. These blocks were obtained using industrial glass, as in the case of his famous project for the Accademia Bridge. This was in the mid-1980s. At that same time, the artist was making houses and skyscrapers of transparent glass measuring up to a meter high. Architectural sculptures boasting a strong appeal thanks to their geometric perfection and underlying desire to open the way to a more livable city, they were shown with sea-green crystal works and Randi in the artist’s workshop at Murano, just a short distance from the Museo del Vetro. Some of Italy’s leading photographers, including Ugo Mulas, Gianni Berengo Gardin, Paolo Monti and Franco Fontana have, through their cameras, interpreted the innovative nature of Luciano Vistosi’s work: a dialogue between sculpture and photography that was important for the artist, as he himself used cameras to seek out lines, forms, shapes and inspirations for new creations.

 

$950