Michel Rodde

“Hommage A Paris”

Oil on Canvas Painting

Circa 1970’s

Unlined canvas, framed in a period frame.

Dimensions:

Height: 45.5”     Width: 46”

Michel Rodde (French, 1913–2009) was a highly acclaimed French artist, honored and awarded numerous times in France and worldwide during his lifetime.  He mainly received international recognition for his Modern Impressionist style, exhibited so well in this painting.

Signed lower left: Michel Rodde; titled and inscribed en verso: Hommage a Paris / Michel Rodde. There is a Reference Number F2219 on the stretcher. The cardboard protective back cover has an almost completely damaged David Findley gallery label with Ref. #F2219.

No visible condition issues to note.  We make our best effort to provide a fair and descriptive condition report. Please examine the photos attentively, as they are an integral part of the item description.

$4,500


- Still Life with Cognac, Lemons and Grapes - 

Original Painting by

Ernest Fiene, Ca. 1922

Original O/C painting, signed in the lower left corner, and dated 1922

Dimensions:

Height: 24 inches            Width: 20 inches

 Ernest Fiene (German-American,1894–1965)

                Ernest Fiene was a 20th-century American artist who primarily worked in New York City and Woodstock, New York. Ernest Fiene's artwork often focused on bringing out the humanity of a space while simultaneously deconstructing it into abstract shapes. His notable work includes cityscapes, views of New York City in particular, landscapes and other figural art. A fixture on the faculty of the Art Students League, he was also a prolific artist with a body of work spanning many media, from etchings to frescoes. "I am interested more in the future of American art than in the past of European art. Out of this new civilization, out of this machine age, a new school of painters will be developed."  Born in Germany in 1894, Fiene fled his native land in 1912 to avoid military service in what would become World War I. Traveling first to the Netherlands, he continued on to the United States. From 1914 to 1916, he studied at the National Academy of Design in New York City, and from 1916 to 1918 at the Beaux Arts Institute. In 1923, Fiene continued his study of printmaking at the Art Students League of New York. In 1921 he married Jeannette Etarre. From 1928 to 1929, he studied in Paris and traveled in France. Fiene was hired in 1940, along with eight other prominent American artists, to document dramatic scenes and characters during the production of the film The Long Voyage Home, a cinematic adaptation of Eugene O'Neill's plays. In 1945 he divorced his first wife and was married to Alicia Wiencek. Fiene re-established his relationship with the Art Students League in 1948, returning to teach classes in painting and drawing there. In 1948, he was elected into the National Academy of Design as an Associate member, and became a full Academician in 1952. In the 1950's he also served on the faculty of the Famous Artists School in Westport, Connecticut. Fiene died of a heart attack in Paris in 1965.

 Solo Exhibitions

1919 McDowell Club, New York City, NY
1920, 1922-26 Society of Independent Artists, New York City, NY
1923 Whitney Studio Club, New York City, NY
1923-55 Waltham Mills Artists Association, Boston, MA
1924 The New Gallery, New York City, NY
1930-52-54 Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, Philadelphia, PA

Group Exhibitions

1920-41 Society of Independent Artists, New York City, NY
1923-55 Whitney Museum of American Art, New York City, NY
1924 New Gallery, New York City, NY
1930-49 Corcoran Biennial, Washington, D.C.
1930-45 Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh, PA
1928-45 Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL
1940-46 Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

Awards

1932 Guggenheim Fellowship, Guggenheim Museum, New York City, NY
1938 W.A. Clark Prize, Corcoran Gallery, Washington, D.C.
1940 Ada S. Garrett Prize, Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL.

 Memberships

National Academy of Design
Art Students League of New York
Artists Equity Association
International Institute of Arts & Letters
American Artists Congress
Century Association
Guggenheim Fellow
Woodstock Art Association

Salons of America

Public Collections

Museum of Fine Arts Boston
Zinnias and Apples
Deep Winter

Butler Institute of American Art
Colorado Hills

Los Angeles County Museum of Art
Brick Factories

Metropolitan Museum of Art
The Lucy Plant, Carnegie Steel Mill, Pittsburgh
Locomotive
Granary

Addison Gallery of American Art
White Roses

San Diego Museum of Art
Venice #2

Smithsonian American Art Museum and the Renwick Gallery
St. Michael's in Brooklyn
Washington Arch

 

$5,500


- fishermen Boats Ashore -

Federico Morello

Ca. 1920's

Oil on canvas, signed lower right: F. Morello, mounted in gilded period frame.

 Dimensions:

40" L x 27" W

.            Federico Morello (Italian, 1875 - 1938) was a known visual artist, famous for depicting seascapes, genre scenes, architecture and nature of Southern Italy. This beautiful oil painting on canvas depicts a group of fishermen with their boats ashore after the day at sea.

 

$7,200


- Manhattan Snow Storm Scene -

A Painting by

Johann Berthelsen

Ca. 1960's

                Depicting figures bustling along a Manhattan street during a snowstorm, this romantic oil on canvas painting of New York City winter snow scene is signed lower right.

Dimensions:

Height: 12 inches            Width: 16 inches

Medium:

Oil on canvas, period frame.

Johann Henrik Carl Berthelsen (1883 –1972)

                Coming to America as a child, he enjoyed early success as an opera singer and music teacher. His friendship with the artist Wayman Adams resulted in a move to New York and experimentation with painting. When the Great Depression took a toll on his musical career, Berthelsen began selling oil scenes of his beloved New York City, which quickly found prominent buyers including William Randolph Hearst. While he also painted pastoral and mountain landscapes, Berthelson's snow scenes of Manhattan are particularly prized.

 

$15,500


- Portrait of James Abbott McNeill Whistler -

A Painting by

Salvatore Anthony Guarino

Ca. 1904

DESCRIPTION

Aesthetic Movement.        Oil on canvas.         Signed lower right and en verso.         Original ornate gilt frame designed by Stanford White and made by Thomas Dewing.

 DIMENSIONS

Frame: 15 3/8 x 9 1/2”              Painting: 11 1/2 x 5 1/2”

PROVENANCE

Presented here, the portrait of James Abbott McNeill Whistler by Salvatore Anthony Guarino was in the collection of Wanda Best Anderson, a prominent socialite. The painting bears her collection label and number 52 on verso. (see detail image)

THE BUTTERFLY MONOGRAM

Salvatore Anthony Guarino (Italian/American, 1883 - 1919) was a personal friend and great admirer of Whistler's work. He completed this portrait in 1904, but a year after Whistler's death. Guarino painted it in Whistler's own style. The fact that he masterfully adopted Whistler’s palette and portrait characteristics and signed it with both his own signature and Whistler’s stylized butterfly emblem clearly suggests Guarino intended the work as a testament of their closeness as painters and personal friends. Mid-right on the canvas is Whistler's monogram, which he developed during the the 1860s partly as a result of his interest in Asian art. He studied the potter's marks on the china he had begun to collect and decided to design a monogram of his initials. Over time this evolved into the shape of an abstract butterfly. By around 1880, he added a stinger to the butterfly image to create a mark representing both his gentle, sensitive nature and his provocative, feisty spirit. Whistler was fond of designing the frames for his work and took great care in the appropriate placement of his butterfly signature on both his paintings and his custom-made frames.

THE FRAME

Framed in an early 20th century American gilt frame with a receding profile and raised grille panel designed by Stanford White, one of America's most recognized architects and designers at that time. White would sketch frame designs for friends and colleagues. White's circle of collaborators included the American painter Thomas Dewing, who executed White's design for the portrait of Whistler.  White's design called for a raised grille pattern to gather and reflect light.  White did not mark his frames with his initials or any other identifying symbols. 

ABOUT WHISTLER

Barbara Weinberg, former Curator at the Department of American Paintings and Sculpture at the Metropolitan Museum of Art has written on Whistler's life and work. The following are excerpts from her piece on Whistler that is available on the Met Museum's site. “James McNeill Whistler participated in the artistic ferment of Paris and London in the late nineteenth century, crafted a distinctive style from diverse sources, and arrived at a version of Post-Impressionism in the mid-1860s, a time when most of his contemporaries in the avant-garde were still exploring Realism and Impressionism. Born in Lowell, Massachusetts, Whistler spent part of his youth in Saint Petersburg, Russia, where his father, a civil engineer, advised on the construction of the railroad to Moscow and Whistler took drawing classes at the Imperial Academy of Sciences. Upon his return home, Whistler entered the United States Military Academy at West Point. He studied drawing with Robert W. Weir but had less success in other subjects; his failure in chemistry led to his dismissal from the academy in 1854. After working in the drawings division of the United States Coast and Geodetic Survey, where he received his first training in etching, Whistler—already fluent in French from his childhood years in Russia—decided to pursue a career as an artist by going to Paris to study. Whistler arrived in the French capital late in 1855, at least a decade ahead of the great wave of his compatriots who would seek art instruction there. He enrolled in the école Imperial et Spéciale de Dessin (the "petite école") and in Charles Gleyre's independent teaching atelier, where Beaux-Arts principles prevailed (and where the future Impressionists, including Claude Monet and Pierre-Auguste Renoir, would study a few years later). Then and thereafter, Whistler's artistic development would owe less to his formal lessons than to influences outside the academic world. He responded to paintings by Dutch and Spanish Baroque masters, especially Rembrandt, Johannes Vermeer, Pieter de Hooch, Gabriël Metsu, and Diego Velázquez, and by contemporary French painters who admired the same traditions, notably Gustave Courbet, Henri Fantin-Latour, and Alphonse Legros. In 1858, Fantin-Latour, Legros, and Whistler proclaimed their allied interests by organizing themselves as the Société des Trois. Whistler also became friendly with Carolus-Duran, Zacharie Astruc, and Félix Bracquemond and was attracted to the innovative art of Édouard Manet, two years his senior, whom he met in the summer of 1861. The writings of Charles Baudelaire and Théophile Thoré (pseudonym for Willem Bürger), which stressed the importance of harmonious picture surfaces, and French painters' growing interest in Japanese aesthetics would also inform Whistler's style and philosophy of art.

 Whistler had established a connection with London in the late 1840s when he went to live for a year with his half-sister Deborah and her husband, the English physician and etcher Seymour Haden. In May 1859, he decided to settle in London and to work at a distance from his avant-garde French colleagues, although he remained a conduit of ideas between them and his English artist friends. The latter included Dante Gabriel Rossetti, John Everett Millais, and other Pre-Raphaelites, whose paintings influenced Whistler's and who shared his enthusiasm for Japanese prints and blue-and-white porcelain. Initially, Whistler merely included Asian costumes and accessories as props in his works but, by the mid-1860s, he adopted Japanese principles of composition and spatial organization. His landscapes of those years reveal that he had rejected his earlier commitment to transcribing nature in the manner of Courbet, and was responding instead to formalist imperatives, including flat, decorative surfaces, subtle tonal harmonies, and allusive, rather than literal, subjects. Taking a cue from a critic who had referred to his early portrait of his mistress, The White Girl (1862; National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.), as a "symphony in white," Whistler began to envision and entitle his works with the abstract language of music, calling them symphonies, compositions, harmonies, nocturnes, arrangements, and so forth.

During the late 1860s, Whistler struggled to create harmonious multi-figured arrangements that would recapitulate his successful experiments with landscapes. By 1871, he had decided to pull back from that ambitious initiative and to concentrate on single-figure subjects. His seminal canvas in this vein was Arrangement in Gray and Black, No. 1: The Artist's Mother (1871; Musée d'Orsay, Paris). In portraits that followed, including Harmony in Yellow and Gold: The Gold Girl—Connie Gilchrist (11.32) and Arrangement in Flesh Color and Black: Portrait of Theodore Duret (13.20), Whistler continued to emphasize strong silhouettes, elegant contours, and beautiful surface patterns; calibrate the placement of the figure in relation to the edges of the canvas; investigate delicate variations on one subdued hue or a pair of neighboring or contrasting hues; and balance description of appearances with what he perceived to be pictorial necessities.

 Whistler invented a monogram signature—a stylized butterfly based on his initials—and always placed it deliberately as a compositional element, not just a maker's mark. His devotion to overall harmony extended to interior decoration, furniture, and the design of frames and even entire exhibitions. He became a central figure in the Aesthetic movement, which was founded on the philosophy of "art for art's sake" and emphasized artistic principles, elevated taste, and creative eclecticism in the conception and production of furniture, metalwork, ceramics and glass, textiles and wallpaper, and other objects.

He was also an influential printmaker. Whistler's innovative paintings and pronouncements invited controversy. He famously filed and won a libel suit in 1878 against the aging English art critic John Ruskin, who had accused him of "flinging a pot of paint in the public's face" when he showed an almost abstract city scene—Nocturne in Black and Gold: The Falling Rocket (1875; Detroit Institute of Art)—in an exhibition at London's Grosvenor Gallery in 1877. Whistler was instrumental in establishing the credo of modern art. In 1885—a year before George Seurat's emblematic Post-Impressionist canvas, Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte (1884–86; Art Institute of Chicago), appeared in the French Impressionists' final group exhibition and announced the end of naturalistic transcription as an avant-garde goal—Whistler proclaimed in his famous "Ten O'Clock" lecture: Nature contains the elements, in color and form, of all pictures, as the keyboard contains the notes of all music. But the artist is born to pick, and choose, and group with science, these elements, that the result may be beautiful—as the musician gathers his notes, and forms his chords, until he bring forth from chaos glorious harmony.

 To say to the painter, that Nature is to be taken as she is, is to say to the player, that he may sit on the piano. That Nature is always right, is an assertion, artistically, as untrue, as it is one whose truth is universally taken for granted. Nature is very rarely right, to such an extent even, that it might almost be said that Nature is usually wrong: that is to say, the condition of things that shall bring about the perfection of harmony worthy a picture is rare, and not common at all.

 

$22,500


- Summer Morning, Venice -

Original Oil on Canvas Painting by

Antoine Bouvard

Ca. 1905

                A quiet summer morning, and a single Gondolier moves elegantly through a Venetian waterway, on his way to pick up a precious cargo of lovers. A blissful blue sky scattered delicately with clouds envelopes the beautiful stone buildings below, whispering of long hot days to come.

Dimensions

Height: 20 inches               Width: 39 inches

 

 Éloi-Noël Béraud a/k/a Antoine Bouvard & Marc-Aldine

(French, 1875-1957)

                Éloi Noel Beraud is the real name of the artist Antoine Bouvard also known as Marc Aldine. This is according to his great-granddaughter, Delphine Bouvard. Born at St. Jean-de-Bournay in L’Isère, he trained as an architect under Constant-Dufeus at the Ecole des Beaux-Arts in Paris. He became Director of Architectural Services for the Seine and was responsible for building the Bourse and the Boulevard Morland. Beraud visited Venice at the beginning of the twentieth century and instantly fell in love with its special light and scenery, which is so seductive to artists. He returned to the city many times over the following fifty years and specialised in Venetian views, for which he is justly famous. He exhibited throughout France and Italy as well as many provincial European galleries during his own lifetime. His sensitive understanding of Venice made the artist very popular. Not only did he capture the activity and glamour of the Grand Canal and the Santa Maria Della Salute, but he also caught the atmosphere and serenity of the backwaters. His paintings demonstrate his architectural skill whilst reflecting his love of Venice’s unique light effects. His works are broad and confidently painted, capturing all the charm of one of the most beautiful cities in the world. The artist’s son George Noel Beraud (1912-1972) was also an artist and painted under the name George Noel Bouvard. He was born in Paris and died in Ecouen and painted similar style to that of his father.

                Bouvard was born at St. Etienne in France in 1875. His early artistic education was undertaken at the Ecole des Beaux-Arts in Paris, where he spent three years under a scholarship. His birth name was Eloi Noel Beraud although he signed his paintings Bouvard, Marc Aldine and Pelletier, amongst other pseudonyms but it is by Bouvard that he is best known. Study trips followed throughout Europe, where he began to paint the landscapes of Southern Europe and the Mediterranean coastline. Most of his output went through a dealer in Paris who recommended that he consider Venice as a subject. From that point his career never looked back. Whilst Bouvard’s subject matter is similar to Canaletto and Guardi, he differs from these great artists by his use of a free impressionist technique, with the introduction of more color and warmth. Examples of this fine French artist’s work can be found in museums and private collections throughout the world. Gladwell’s held the first one-man exhibition of his work in Britain in 1928, from which the late Queen Mary purchased two examples of his work. Mr. Fuller continued to acquire paintings from this fine artist up until Bouvard died in 1957.

$21,000


- Village Landscape -

Original Painting by

Ernest Fiene

Ca. 1921

                       Ernest Fiene (American, 1894–1965) was a 20th-century American artist who primarily worked in New York City and Woodstock, New York. Ernest Fiene's artwork often focused on bringing out the humanity of a space while simultaneously deconstructing it into abstract shapes. His notable work includes cityscapes, views of New York City in particular, landscapes and other figural art.  A fixture on the faculty of the Art Students League, he was also a prolific artist with a body of work spanning many media, from etchings to frescoes. "I am interested more in the future of American art than in the past of European art. Out of this new civilization, out of this machine age, a new school of painters will be developed."  Born in Germany in 1894, Fiene fled his native land in 1912 to avoid military service in what would become World War I. Traveling first to the Netherlands, he continued on to the United States. From 1914 to 1916 he studied at the National Academy of Design in New York City, and from 1916 to 1918 at the Beaux Arts Institute.   In 1921, he married Jeannette Etarre. In 1923, Fiene continued his study of printmaking at the Art Students League of New York. From 1928 to 1929, he studied in Paris and traveled in France. In 1940, Fiene was hired along with eight other prominent American artists, to document dramatic scenes and characters during the production of the film "The Long Voyage Home", a cinematic adaptation of Eugene O'Neill's plays. In 1945, he divorced his first wife and was married to Alicia Wiencek. Fiene re-established his relationship with the Art Students League in 1948, returning to teach classes in painting and drawing there. In 1948, he was elected into the National Academy of Design as an Associate member, and became a full Academician in 1952. In the 1950s he also served on the faculty of the Famous Artists School in Westport, Connecticut. Fiene died of a heart attack in Paris in 1965.

                       The painting, in all probability, depicts a small Connecticut village by a lake. It is signed by the artist, and dated 1921 in the front lower right corner. 

 Media: Oil on board                                                     Height: 16 inches                                                            Width: 12 inches

 

Solo Exhibitions

1919 McDowell Club, New York City, NY
1920, 1922-26 Society of Independent Artists, New York City, NY
1923 Whitney Studio Club, New York City, NY
1923-55 Waltham Mills Artists Association, Boston, MA
1924 The New Gallery, New York City, NY
1930-52-54 Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, Philadelphia, PA

Group Exhibitions

1920-41 Society of Independent Artists, New York City, NY
1923-55 Whitney Museum of American Art, New York City, NY
1924 New Gallery, New York City, NY
1930-49 Corcoran Biennial, Washington, D.C.
1930-45 Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh, PA
1928-45 Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL
1940-46 Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

Awards

1932 Guggenheim Fellowship, Guggenheim Museum, New York City, NY
1938 W.A. Clark Prize, Corcoran Gallery, Washington, D.C.
1940 Ada S. Garrett Prize, Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL.

Memberships

National Academy of Design
Art Students League of New York
Artists Equity Association
International Institute of Arts & Letters
American Artists Congress
Century Association
Guggenheim Fellow
Woodstock Art Association
Salons of America

Public Collections

Museum of Fine Arts Boston
Zinnias and Apples
Deep Winter

Butler Institute of American Art
Colorado Hills

Los Angeles County Museum of Art
Brick Factories

Metropolitan Museum of Art
The Lucy Plant, Carnegie Steel Mill, Pittsburgh
Locomotive
Granary

Addison Gallery of American Art
White Roses

San Diego Museum of Art
Venice #2

Smithsonian American Art Museum and the Renwick Gallery
St. Michael's in Brooklyn
 

$8,650


nude

Eugene Paul, known as Gen Paul, was born in 1895 and raised in the bohemian atmosphere of Montmartre. A self-taught artist, Gen Paul began expressing himself in drawings and paintings as a child, his earliest works show a remarkable talent.  He was wounded twice in World War One, the second time he lost one of his legs. During his recovery he turned to painting, which became his passion and his livelihood for almost 60 years. Many of Gen Paul’s greatest works from the 1920s have remained in private collections. Retrospective exhibitions of Gen Paul’s work were held at the Musée de Montmartre in 1986, for the hundred-year anniversary of his birth in 1995 at Museum Les Cordeliers, and in 1998 in Zurich, Switzerland. He is represented in museums in Berne, and Geneva, Switzerland, and the Musée National d’Art Moderne in Paris.

  • Date of manufacture : 1968
  • Period : 20th Century
  • Country : France
  • Painter : Gen Paul (French, 1895 - 1975)
  • Remarks: Signed and dated 1968
  • Height : 25 inches
  • Width : 18 1/2 inches
  • Medium : Original drawing, crayolor on paper
  • Inventory number : P-20-0001

 

$7,500


"Bathing Caesar"

Original Watercolor by

Robert G. Sternloff

Ca. 1940's-50's

Dimensions:

Height: 18 1/2 inches / 46.25 cm            Width: 8 3/4 inches / 21.9 cm

                Robert G. Sternloff (American, 1885 - 1965) was born in Sweden and has become a prominent American illustrator doing advertising art for many companies, including Fuller Brush. He also did cover art for the Field and Stream magazine. However. he was best known for his paintings of dogs, particularly hounds. One of his Beagle paintings is in the 200 painting collection of various breeds at the American Kennel Club. He did paint the Hounds of the DuPont's sometime in the 30's. The artist died in 1965 in Mill Valley, California.

                Signed and nicely framed, this mixed-media work in watercolor, gouache and pencil on paper is typical of work that was provided by Robert G. Sternloff to the Domino Club and other bars and restaurants in San Francisco during the 1940's and the 50's.

 

$850