French Art Deco

Cloisonné Enamel Vase with Fish and Sea Horses

Ca. 1920s

imensions: Height: 15-1/4 inches         Diameter: 7 inches

Probably, by Maison Paul Lauchet Paris, this elegant French Art Deco (circa 1930) flower vase combines the simplicity and brevity of lines of the stylized fish and sea horses on the foreground of sea waves of almost geometrical design. The complexity and sophistication of the pattern done in the famous French technique, Champlevé is enriched by the bright multi-color enamel, covering the complete perimeter of the vase.

Paul François Louchet (French 1854-1936) was a famous painter and designer, whose creation during the Art Nouveau and Art Deco era were extremely popular and in great demand. He trained by Jules Lefebvre and Henri Harpignies. He exhibited at the Paris Salon. He began by working on the technique of carving, his studio located at No. 3, Rue Auber, in the 9th arrondissement of Paris and his creations are identifiable with the stamp Louchet Fondeur Paris.

A friend of Majorelle, Daum and Lalique, he was president of the Chambre Syndicale des Manufacturers de Bronze1. Mayor of the city of Herblay in 1887, he raised strong protests (with a trial that was lost) against the spill of the sewers of Paris in the plains of Achères. The epidemic of typhoid attributed to the insalubrity thus generated carried off her fifteen-year-old daughter and, distraught, Paul Louchet abandoned business to, from 1890, devote himself to painting. He was also a sculptor and aquafortist. Friend of Henri Harpignies with whom he painted in the forest of Fontainebleau, also posing his easel in the region of Melun and Meaux, even making a trip to North Africa, he mainly painted landscapes that are distinguished by an iridescent light that it is particular to him.

Cloisonné is an ancient technique for decorating metalwork objects. In recent centuries, vitreous enamel has been used, and inlays of cut gemstones, glass and other materials were also used during older periods. The resulting objects can also be called cloisonné. The decoration is formed by first adding compartments (cloisons in French to the metal object by soldering or affixing silver or gold wires or thin strips placed on their edges. These remain visible in the finished piece, separating the different compartments of the enamel or inlays, which are often of several colors. Cloisonné enamel objects are worked on with enamel powder made into a paste, which then needs to be fired in a kiln.

In antiquity, the cloisonné technique was mostly used for jewellery and small fittings for clothes, weapons or similar small objects decorated with geometric or schematic designs, with thick cloison walls. In the Byzantine Empire techniques using thinner wires were developed to allow more pictorial images to be produced, mostly used for religious images and jewelry, and by then always using enamel. By the 14th century this enamel technique had spread to China, where it was soon used for much larger vessels such as bowls and vases; the technique remains common in China to the present day, and cloisonné enamel objects using Chinese-derived styles were produced in the West from the 18th century.


sold


Swiss Art Deco

A L'Emeraude

Brass and Emerald-Green Guilloche Enamel

Photo Frame

1920s

This stunning A l'Emeraude Brass, Patinated Bronze and Guilloche Enamel Photo Frame  was made in the 1920s.

Dimensions:

Height: 9-7/16 inches Width: 6 inches

A l’Emeraude Chronometry & Jewelery, founded in 1909, has forged a reputation for excellence in Switzerland and internationally. It has welcomed many crowned heads, an increasingly diverse, and numerous clientele. Still in existence today after over 110 years in business, since June 2017 it now houses a new unique space in Lausanne, Switzerland, entirely dedicated to Patek Philippe and Rolex watches.

 

$2,200


Silvered Pewter and Rock Crystal

Sculpture of

Penguin Family,

Ca. 1920's

Dimensions:

Height: 4”     Width: 4.5”     Depth: 8”

Perfect as a desk or table sculpture, as well as valet, ring dish etc.

SOLD


Potter Studio

Hand-Carved White Jade & Brass

~ Bookends ~

Ca. 1915-1924

            This rare pair of elegant bookends by the famous Potter Studio is a very bright example of an object in the pure Arts and Crafts movement tradition - the perfect rendering, the conciseness of design, the severity and the refined simplicity of the lines of the brass parts; as well as the use of contrasting romantic elements - in this case, beautifully hand-carved white jade medallions, depicting Paradise birds surrounded by flowers.

 Dimensions:

Height: 5 1/2"         Length: 7"         Width: 4"

                 Both bookends are in excellent antique condition: the brass parts have original intact patina with no scratches or imperfections; the hand-carved white jade medallions are in perfect condition with no brakes or cracks. Each of the bookends is hallmarked "Potter Studio".

 Horace E. Potter (1873 - 1948)

                Horace Ephraim Potter was born into a prosperous Cleveland family in 1873…. Potter began his studies [at the Cleveland School of Art (CSA)] in 1894, graduating in June 1898…. After graduation from CSA, Potter embarked upon a year of study with Amy Sacker at the Cowles School of Art in Boston. Potter exhibited in [the Boston Society of Arts and Crafts'] second annual exhibitionin Copley Hall in April 1899, and at the conclusion of his studies received a master's degree, specializing in metal­work. Returning to Cleveland, he taught at the Cleveland School of Art from 1900 to 1909, giving classes in decorative design and historic ornament.

                While teaching, Potter established a studio in downtown Cleveland. In 1905 he moved to his family's farm on the edge of the city, converting a chicken coop where he and CSA classmates Wilhelmina Stephan and Ferdinand Burgdorff designed and made silver and jewelry…. Potter maintained strong ties with Boston, becoming a "craftsman" member of the Society of Arts and Crafts in 1907 and attaining master classification the following year.

                Potter spent four and a half months in England and Europe in the spring and summer of 1907, visiting Ashbee in August…. When Potter returned from his European trip in 1907, it was clear that his experience of Ashbee's Guild of Handicraft had confirmed his belief that the creative spirit was best nurtured when artists worked together. Moving to a series of locations on Euclid Avenue between 1910 and 1928, Potter expanded his space and founded Potter Studio.

                Potter may have been attempting to recreate the interdisciplinary atmosphere of Ashbee's guild by opening his premises to other artists as well. He employed fellow graduates and former students of the Cleveland School of Art, and welcomed artists in other mediums with lodging and studio space. R. Guy Cowan, the founder of Cowan Pottery, came to Cleveland in 1908 to establish a ceramics program at the city's innovative Technical High School. Potter became Cowan's landlord and supported his endeavors. Cowan founded his own business in 1913, but Potter purchased studio-made vessels as early as 1909 and embellished them with silver or pewter lids.

                Marrying fellow silversmith Florence Loomis in 1914, he went on to found Potter & Bentley Studios in 1928, and Potter & Mellen in 1933. In 1928, Gurdon W. Bentley and Potter became partners, moved the shop to its current location, and renamed it Potter Bentley Studios.  The new shop expanded to sell items such as china and garden accessories.  Bentley dissolved the partnership in 1933, and that year Louis Mellen joined the company, which was renamed to its present Potter and Mellen, Inc. Horace E. Potter died in 1948,and in 1967, Louis Mellen sold the firm to both Frederick Miller,a renowned designer & silversmith, and Jack Schlundt. Together both maintained the tradition of hand-wrought jewelry and hollowware.

                In 1989, Ellen Stirn Mavec purchased Potter and Mellen, Inc. which remains in its same location at 10405 Carnegie Avenue. Ellen has continued the tradition of excellence in craftsmanship by hiring only the finest jewelers to work in the studios, as well as highlighting giftware and antiques, her personal expertise.

 Arts and Crafts movement

                The Arts and Crafts movement was an international movement in the decorative and fine arts that began in Britain and flourished in Europe and North America between 1880 and 1910, emerging in Japan in the 1920s. it stood for traditional craftsmanship using simple forms, and often used medieval, romantic, or folk styles of decoration. It advocated economic and social reform and was essentially anti-industrial. It had a strong influence on the arts in Europe until it was displaced by Modernism in the 1930s, and its influence continued among craft makers, designers, and town planners long afterwards.

$450


Austrian Jugenstil

~ Brass Box ~

Ca. 1900

              Wonderful in its unique Jugenstil style and semi-spherical design, this stunning repose hand-hammered brass box with cover was made in Austria (probably, Vienna), circa 1900. Unmarked. Excellent condition with only minor signs of usage.  Would make a gorgeous addition to any collection!

 Dimensions:

Height: 6 1/2 inches               Diameter: 5 3/4 inches

               Austrian Jugendstil

                The Austrian Jugendstil differs dramatically in style from the other European styles. Vienna was the heart of an independent movement. In contrast to the floral patterns and shapes of the French artist Charles Plumet a special unique style was developed in Vienna.; clear lines were introduced into architecture (Adolf Loos: Villa Steiner/ House at Michaelerplatz; Otto Wagner: Vienna`s City Railway/ Post Office and Interior in Vienna) as it was also introduced into furniture design (Josef Hoffmann, Kolo Moser). The Vienna artists joined together with writer Hermann Bahr, the painter Gustav Klimt and the architect Otto Wagner to form the „Wiener Secession“. Artistic disciplines were not separated from each other in Jugendstil, but flowed together. The artists endeavored to complete a "Gesamtkunstwerk" (total art work). They brought their Avant Garde ideas into all fields of art and daily life: Literature – Music – Painting – Architectur – Furniture design – Cloth weaving – Wallpaper – Lighting – Jewelry – Cutlery – Glass – Heating systems. Their appreciation of details in their work is expressed in the use of: Faceted Glass, decorative and ornamented wood and metalwork.

$850


American Arts & Crafts

Lacquered Brass and Bronze

~ Jewelry Tray ~

Ca. 1900

               

This beautiful terracotta-color lacquered brass jewelry tray with bronze handle in the form of a leaf is tastefully decorated with a patinated bronze handle in form of a branch and miniature turtle and a fly. Unmarked.

 Dimensions:

Length: 9 3/4 inches         Width: 3 1/8 inches

 

The Arts and Crafts Movement

                The Arts and Crafts movement emerged during the late Victorian period in England, the most industrialized country in the world at that time. Anxieties about industrial life fueled a positive revaluation of handcraftsmanship and pre-capitalist forms of culture and society. Arts and Crafts designers sought to improve standards of decorative design, believed to have been debased by mechanization, and to create environments in which beautiful and fine workmanship governed. The Arts and Crafts movement did not promote a particular style, but it did advocate reform as part of its philosophy and instigated a critique of industrial labor; as modern machines replaced workers, Arts and Crafts proponents called for an end to the division of labor and advanced the designer as craftsman.

$1,100


American Arts & Crafts

~ Vase ~

Ca. 1900-1910

                This is a stunning hand-crafted Art Nouveau/Arts & Crafts Era (Circa 1900-1910) double-handled vase, constructed of beautiful, richly patinated copper. The vase has not been polished, in order to preserve its natural, aged beauty. Unmarked, but exceptional. Though it is around 100 years old, it is nearly perfect, having only some very light bumps here and there, absolutely not affecting the beauty of this historic pieces.

 Dimensions:

Height: 16 inches            Diameter: 8 inches            Base diameter: 6 inches

The Arts and Crafts Movement

                The Arts and Crafts movement emerged during the late Victorian period in England, the most industrialized country in the world at that time. Anxieties about industrial life fueled a positive revaluation of handcraftsmanship and pre-capitalist forms of culture and society. Arts and Crafts designers sought to improve standards of decorative design, believed to have been debased by mechanization, and to create environments in which beautiful and fine workmanship governed. The Arts and Crafts movement did not promote a particular style, but it did advocate reform as part of its philosophy and instigated a critique of industrial labor; as modern machines replaced workers, Arts and Crafts proponents called for an end to the division of labor and advanced the designer as craftsman.

$250


GERMAN JUGENSTIL

WMF

~ A Pair of Challises ~

Ca. 1910

Dimensions:

Height: 10 7/8 inches         Top diameter: 4 7/8 inches         Bottom diameter:        5 inches

                This pair of challises is a rare example of the famous WMF early Jugenstil objects, famous among collectors for their unique style and an unusual combination of materials - in this case, copper and wood. The bottom is marked with a beehive stamp with a running ostrich in the middle. As this particular early mark was introduced in 1909 and y mark was in use only up to 1914, we estimate the approximate year of the production, as 1910.

WMF

                Originally Würtemburgische Machin Fabrik AG, WMF was originally founded in 1853 in Geislingen an der Steige, Germany.  In 1880 there was an amalgamation of Straub & Sohn and A Ritter & Co. and the factory became famous for domestic and art metal ware with an appropriate change of name to Würtemburgische Metallwaren Fabrik AG.  A variety of marks have been used during their 150 years of production.  The well known 'ostrich' mark originates from the German word for ostrich, 'Der Strauss' after Daniel Straub, one of the founders.  The 'G' in the mark stands for the town of Geislingen, on the River Fils and near Ulm in Baden-Württemburg. 

 $1,400


French Art Nouveau

Hand-Hammered Copper, Wood & Leather

~ FLOWER Vase ~

Ca. 1900

Dimensions: 19-1/2″ high x 6" wide (max.) x 2-5/8" dia. (top)

 Circa 1900, this striking, tall & elegant French Art Nouveau flower vase made out of wood, hand-hammered copper and leather; its narrow top encrusted with four round art-glass cabochons. The unusual shape of the vase with a narrow elongated neck perfectly matches the contours of the couple of swans, quietly floating on a pond. There is an original zinc insert.

$1,450