- French Art Deco -

Schneider Art Glass

A Pair of Cornet Vases

- Ca. 1925 -

                This amazing pair of superbly elegant Schneider cornet vases is one of the most beautiful examples of the French Art Glass of the high Art Deco period (1920 - 1930). Very concise in form, standing atop small pedestals and dramatically expanding upwards, they primarily attract attention by the quite unusual color selection and, most importantly, by the combination of several types of techniques used to ensure an unexpected effect for the observer by creating the illusion of seething seawater. Both vases are in perfect vintage condition - no chips, scratches, imperfections, restorations. Both vases are signed.

 Measurements:

Height: 14 3/4 inches            Upper diameter:  6 inches            Bottom diameter: 5 inches

 Schneider Art Glass

                For many people, the words “French Art Glass” are immediately associated with names like Daum and Galle. However, there is another early 20th century firm that, until recently, has escaped the notice of many. The recent sale of four different Schneider items for over $2,000 each peaked our interest in this company and its beautiful wares. The Schneider company produced art glass beginning in 1917 with the bulk of their production coming in the years 1925 through 1930. Schneider was operated by two brothers. Ernest Schneider handled the sales and marketing portion of the business. The fabulous designs and artistic flair came from brother Charles. Charles Schneider attended the prestigious Ecole des Beaux Arts in Paris. At the same time, he worked as a designer at the famed Daum factory in Nancy.

                The Schneiders formed their own small glass company prior to World War I, but when both brothers were called to participate in the war effort, the company failed. A new company was formed in 1917 with support from investors. Eventually, the Schneider brothers were able to purchase the company from the investors. In 1925, they exhibited their glass at the now famous 1925 Exposition of Decorative Arts in Paris. The exposure catapulted sales resulting in the most prolific period of production in the history of the Schneider factory. Schneider continued to make art glass until 1931, when the company virtually ended production of art glass due to the effect of the stock market crash two years earlier.

                The Schneider company produced two distinct lines. The higher end line was signed Schneider in acid etched script or block letters, often followed by an angled slash mark. This line was sold primarily at French galleries and featured handmade art glass — mainly engraved pieces in the classic cameo style. The Le Verre Francais line was intended for a larger audience and was sold in department stores and jewelry stores. Pieces from the Le Verre line are marked Le Verre Francais or Charder (a contraction of the name Charles Schneider). The mark sometimes included an urn logo. Lamps and some vases can be found with both signatures. Le Verre pieces used production techniques such as acid etching to keep costs down. Much of the Le Verre production was exported to the US and other countries.

                The Le Verre Francais line was intended for a larger audience and was sold in department stores and jewelry stores. Pieces from the Le Verre line are marked Le Verre Francais or Charder (a contraction of the name Charles Schneider.) The mark sometimes included an urn logo. Lamps and some vases can be found with both signatures. Le Verre pieces used production techniques such as acid etching to keep costs down. Much of the Le Verre production was exported to the US and other countries. Both, the Schneider and Le Verre Francais lines feature classic shapes, beautifully juxtaposed colors and influences that range from Art Nouveau to Deco. Interest in Schneider glass continues to grow. We saw pieces selling on-line in recent months for between $1,000 and $7,500.

                Fakes and reproductions are known. Acid etched Le Verre Francais signatures have been seen on newer, cheaply made glass. In addition, Charles Schneider went on to open another firm in the late 1940s with his son. These later works are more contemporary in style and are generally marked Schneider France in block letters. While not as collectible as the earlier Schneider works, these pieces have begun to gain popularity as well.

                Books dedicated to Schneider can be found in French, like the book above by Edith Mannoni. We were not able to locate any books in English dedicated to Schneider glass, although Schneider items are pictured in many English language books dedicated to French art glass or cameo glass.

 

$3,600


Mid-Century Italian Modernism

Giorgio Frattin

Murano ~ Italian Art Glass

Sculptural Bust

Ca. 1960's - 1970's

            This rare and impressive Italian mid-century modernism Murano multi-color art glass sculptural head is by Giorgio Frattin, another representative of the famous Italian artist family, and Sandro Frattin's cousin. The massive dark blue base has the artist's etched signature, and bears the original paper label. The sculpture is in excellent vintage condition - no cracks, chips, hairlines, repairs or restorations.

 Dimensions:

Total height: 20 3/4 inches     Height of head: 15 3/4 inches      Width of head: 5 inches     Depth of head: 7 inches

Base height:  4 3/4 inches                  Base width:  4 3/8 inches            Base depth:  4 3/8 inches

 

$3,500


French Art Nouveau

~ Perfume Bottle ~

Etched & Hand-Engraved Crystal and Silver Repose

Body Lotion or Bath Salt Jar

Ca. 1900

Dimensions:

Height: 5 1/2 inches         Max. width: 3 1/2 inches         Bottom diameter: 2 7/8 inches

                This fine and unusual French antique perfume bottle of a superb quality and workmanship and can also function as a body lotion or bath salt jar/bottle. After over a hundred years, today this elegant object is ready to be used for the intended purposes, and would be an exquisitely tasteful decoration for a dressing table, dresser or vanity of the most demanding of the ladies. It is made of a very thick crystal and has a sterling silver hinged round lid. The crystal part of the bottle is masterfully etched and hand-engraved throughout its perimeter with the Irises pattern, a floral motif made one of the most popular during the Art Nouveau era. The top of the sterling silver hinged round lid is also decorated with a charming bouquet of the same flowers, rendered in the repose technique. Both, the neck and the top cover of the lid are stamped with a full set of French hallmarks, half-erased due to long-term use and therefore illegible. The repose bouquet of Irises on the cover is stamped additionally with an essayist' hallmark with artist initials "RD". This beautiful perfume bottle is in fine antique condition consistent with age, with minimal wear to crystal and silver parts, no cracks, no hairlines, no damages, no restorations.

 

$450


Mid-Century Italian Modernism

Luciano Vistosi

Venetian Murano Art Glass

- Bud Vase -

Ca. 1955

                This absolutely unique, beautiful red, green and clear art glass bud vase of the most unusual design was created in the 1950's or 1960's by Luciano Vistosi, who was born and died on the islands of Murano in the lagoon of Venice, the great sculptor and glass artist,  and one of the most significant figures in recent Italian art.

Dimensions:

Height: 4 3/4 inches            Length: 8 1/2 inches            Depth: 6 1/2 inches

 Luciano Vistosi (Italian, 1931 – 2010 )

                It was in the glass manufactory of his father that Luciano Vistosi (Murano, Italy: 1931 – 2010 ) learned to pull and raise the incandescent mass and transform it into an eagle, a dove, a farming girl, a female nude; or nightmares. Following his father’s death in 1952, Vistosi founded the new Vetreria Vistosi with his uncle Oreste and brother Gino with the aim of making products linked to the latest developments in design. He also involved some leading firms, such as Aulenti, Sottsass, Magistretti, Zanuso, and Peduzzi. He concentrated above all on lighting, producing new products, including some famous series of wall sconces. But what appealed most to him was sculpture. In his artistic development as “sculptor”, Vistosi tested various techniques other than blown glass. Some works are sculpted from enormous blocks of rough glass in line with the “art of removal” typical of sculpting marble. These blocks were obtained using industrial glass, as in the case of his famous project for the Accademia Bridge. This was in the mid-1980s. At that same time, the artist was making houses and skyscrapers of transparent glass measuring up to a meter high. Architectural sculptures boasting a strong appeal thanks to their geometric perfection and underlying desire to open the way to a more livable city, they were shown with sea-green crystal works and Randi in the artist’s workshop at Murano, just a short distance from the Museo del Vetro. Some of Italy’s leading photographers, including Ugo Mulas, Gianni Berengo Gardin, Paolo Monti and Franco Fontana have, through their cameras, interpreted the innovative nature of Luciano Vistosi’s work: a dialogue between sculpture and photography that was important for the artist, as he himself used cameras to seek out lines, forms, shapes and inspirations for new creations.

 

$950